stoopid-girl:

dan-mcneely:

ircimages:

My friend went to a nerd factory. They gave him a bag of rejects and said “Enjoy your bag of diabetes.”

#i want a bag of reject nerds#oh wait i’m on tumblr they’re everywhere

i hate you

stoopid-girl:

dan-mcneely:

ircimages:

My friend went to a nerd factory. They gave him a bag of rejects and said “Enjoy your bag of diabetes.”

i hate you

whoredinarygirl:

anytime a guy says “that’s what she said” always reply with “not to you”

(Source: whoredinarygirl)

thefrogman:

maakomori:

and people forget that harry was a lonely child who lived in an abusive and neglectful household and somehow he managed to be cordial if not kind to people who looked up to him and needed him

he had less than snape coming into hogwarts he didn’t know about hogwarts, he didn’t know there were people like him, he didn’t even have A friend but he was still a basically good person

"can you imagine how much pain snape must have been in when he saw harry" so?

harry is a traumatised child who has been told all his life that he was worthless, that he was trash like his parents, that his parents must have done something to deserve their death, that the abuse rained daily upon him was kindness because he should not expect to be taken care of

he was an eleven year old child i don’t care how much he reminds you of someone you hated you don’t hurt eleven year old children as an adult, as a teacher, especially not ones who have had terrible childhoods to begin with.

dallonsmiles:

ryansgayliner:

the thrilling saga in which Panic! owns the fuck out of WBC

A+ handling of the situation

Kira, bullshit, and truth

ds9anexegesis:

In fact there’s one early episode, Progress, that demonstrates Kira’s difficulty in handling bullshit, where she meets this old man who, well, basically his entire existence is 100% bullshit. And she doesn’t really have a proper defense against bullshit like Sisko does, so she ends up completely buying in on his bullshit for more or less the entire episode, right up until the end where she deals with it the only way she can, by blowing his house the fuck up right in front of his eyes, because the truth of that situation was his house was gonna get blown the fuck up and that’s what Kira gave him.

(Source: )


from Desert Places by Robert Frost

from Desert Places by Robert Frost

(Source: eros-turannos)

  • me when a friend tries to get me to watch a show: I don't know... seven seasons is a lot to dedicate to a show that isn't star trek

shrrrr1mp:

wordcubed:

shrrrr1mp:

does anyone have any good sites for body/figure drawing references?

anatomyrefs and fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn both offer lots of those things (NSFW on the first page of the first one, by the way).

these are great, thanks!

teachytv:

10 years ago today, Ebony Dark’ness Dementia Raven Way went back in time to sedouce Volxemort and protect all of us from his evil plans

reblog this post to honor Enoby’s brave sacrifice, ignore if you’re a prep or a poser

auto-spiral said: Imagine how much crime would diminish in Gotham City if Batman stopped sinking all his cash into Bat Devices and started generously funding social programs.

fabulazerstokill:

the-goddamazon:

Yeah, I wonder if anyone has actually called him on that. Because with all the money he has, he could fund the city’s programs and help clean up Gotham through legal channels, but I remember him arguing with someone about it and they called him out saying he loved being Batman and that’s why he never killed any criminals, because he needed them to feel like he had a sense of purpose. But if he cleaned up Gotham’s streets and funded the right places, there’d eventually be no need for Batman and he’d have to go back to being just Bruce Wayne.

I think that’s a problem with a LOT of superheroes. They get hyped up on their own glory, and even though few to NO people know their true identities, they like the thrill of saving the day so much that they can’t fathom going back to being ‘normal’. So they kind of…let a lot of things slip through the cracks because it gives them something to fix.

That was actually the fulcrum upon which the “Justice Lords” story arc turned in the JL/JLU series. Lex Luthor called out Supes saying he didn’t kill him because he needed a villain in his life, he needed to be able to feel good about the glory that came with being a superhero but he couldn’t do that unless Lex was free. Superman agreed, and then kills Lex. It was an AU, as with most DC storylines, but it was very, very well-written, and they showed the repercussions of superhero hubris in the JLU storyline with Amanda Waller trying to take down the Justice League because they could potentially get out of control.

…I just rambled for way too long, didn’t I?

NOPE you didn’t ramble at all, that’s one of the most annoying things about Batman and his rich white boy ass you are able to fund and put a fucking WATCHTOWER in orbit TWICE but you can’t put money towards some shelters or social programs?!

Really?

REAAAALLLLYYY?

“What is significant about fan fiction is that it often spins the kind of stories that showrunners wouldn’t think to tell, because fanficcers often come from a different demographic. The discomfort seems to be not that the shows are being reinterpreted by fans, but that they are being reinterpreted by the wrong sorts of fans - women, people of colour, queer kids, horny teenagers, people who are not professional writers, people who actually care about continuity (sorry). The proper way for cultural mythmaking to progress, it is implied, is for privileged men to recreate the works of privileged men from previous generations whilst everyone else listens quietly.”

windows-vriska:

the hunger games aren’t amazingly unique or flawless or anything but I think katniss as a character is very important and i think the media misunderstands

we aren’t in it for the cute boys. we’re in it for katniss. thousands of young girls were introduced to an introverted, angry girl born into poverty and watched her become the savior of the world and the media doesn’t seem to understand that she, as a character, is important to girls. not who she dates, but her

carryonmy-assbutt:

tardis221b:

tardis221b:

tardis221b:

two boys have said i’m pretty this week independent of eachother when did this development happen what did i do how do i react help

image

i’m on my way to the d wish me luck friends 

i have acquired the d

image

suitor

betterbemeta:

peonymoonflower:

supercargautier:

manifestingwomanist:

bushtitfeminist:

jadelyn:

enterprisingly:

This is the same man.

This works quite nicely at debunking the “beefcake guys in comics are objectified for women just like women in comics are for men!” imo.  On the left: a magazine tailored for a male audience, showing him in full beefcake-type mode with headlines about how you, too, can look like this.  On the right: a magazine tailored for a female audience, which has a headline about romance and shows him looking more or less like a normal dude.

Tell me again how comic book guys are designed for female sexual enjoyment, completely equivalent to anatomically-improbable spines and giant tits with their own individual centers of gravity, and totes aren’t just male power fantasies.

COMMENTARY

Women don’t treat men the way men treat women.

it’s also worth noting that despite all the geeks complaining about women’s impossible standards, the fantasy on the right sets a really really easy low bar to meet:

"cool clean friendly non-aggressive man who will cook a food for u"

yep what an unfair standard to be subjected to

that last comment was beautiful

This is all great commentary but only 90% right. Not wrong, of course! Women don’t treat men the way men treat men, but while Good Housekeeping’s Editor in Chief is a woman (Jane Francisco), the owner of the company that owns the magazine, Hearst Corporation, is a man (William Hearst, and in fact his Vice chairman and CEO are also men)— and the magazine is a gendered space designated by patriarchal standards, no matter the progressive (or not!) efforts of the women editing, writing, and curating the issues.

Rather, these are two examples of how men treat men— just one with an assumption of what women want in men, curated and presented by real women. The woman as the middleman between a girl readerbase and a male-dominated upper management is a common theme even among the most powerful women in large establishments like this. There are almost always men above them.

These mags tend to be a woman-driven curation of dude-enforced gender roles. Good Housekeeping is still a way that men present men, just indirectly.

When men present women as targets of romantic or sexual interest (assumed for straight men), they objectify them into collections of body parts and goals.

When men present men as targets of romantic or sexual interest (assumed for straight women) they present non-objectified people who are capable of being friendly, caring, safe, and genuine.

When men present men not as targets of romantic or sexual interest, they present them as figures of power to emulate.

When men present women not as targets of romantic or sexual interest… ?????? this is unknown to me in the pages of most magazines, in some way, even a very oblique way women are often presented as, or prepared to be, or are groomed to seek being, targets of sexual or romantic interest.

So yeah. The debunk still works. But it also really shows the amount of control that male-dominated media has over images. They have the choice to do this, or not. Large establishments know women don’t do the same thing to men as men do to women and consciously create media that reflects this, often by having an influential woman be editor in chief while catering to designated standards and content normalized by patriarchal culture.

They have the choice, at any moment in time, to stop portraying women as sex objects even in media aimed at women. These establishments choose, all the time, to not objectify men. Consciously.

But despite limited efforts (often at the hands of women working at these magazines!), they don’t— and can’t while playing to the standards of the magazine— do enough..

(Source: commandercait)